Cooking with Chard


In my ongoing effort to grow more of what I eat and eat more of what I grow, I tried a new recipe last night, and it’s worth sharing! I hadn’t even eaten chard until a few months ago when it was served at Lightfoot’s Supper Club! Shocking, I know. Until last year, I hadn’t had kale, either!! Now it’s a daily menu item! Since Kale and Chard are both prolific and easy to grow year round, it’s worth finding some recipes and making the most of these cheap and extremely healthy foods! Here are some nutritional facts about chard.

I adapted a little bit, but this recipe comes from the book Seasonal Food, a cook’s bible, by Susannah Blake. It is broken down into seasons (duh) and has over 200 recipes using only what is available during each season. While the recipe called for Swiss chard, I had picked up Rainbow (because it’s so pretty) and that worked just fine.

Ingredients
SPICY SAUSAGE-the book calls for 1 1/4 lb, I used less, a foot long link and it was plenty. This would also work well without meat.
2 TBSP OLIVE OIL
1 ONION-chopped
3 CLOVES GARLIC-chopped
14 1/2 OZ CAN CHOPPED TOMATOES-sadly we have used all the tomatoes that I canned, so we had to go with store bought. Fresh would be ideal!
15 OZ CAN GARBANZO BEANS- drained and rinsed. I forgot to prepare mine from dried beans, so used my emergency can.
18 OZ CHARD- I used a standard sized bunch. It could have used more, so I would suggest using 1 1/2-2 bunches.

If your sausage is not cooked, make it happen and slice into chunks. If it is cooked, it can just go in later.
Saute onion and garlic in Olive Oil, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, beans and sausage and simmer about 10 minutes. Add the chard and cook for about 10 minutes more, stirring, until the leaves are tender.

We had this with a broccoli/basil fritatta (all farm ingredients except the milk!), but I swear, it could be a stand alone meal with bread. Even my 12 year old who usually poo-poos the greens, had seconds! (sorry, no pictures of this one!)

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